The University of Ibadan’s best graduating law student reveals her strategies to success

Please check your E-mail inbox or spam to confirm.

Jesudunmo Longe, UI and law school graduate with honors

As we previously reported, only 5 students out of 2,515 received first-class honors in the Law School Result. Three of the five pupils are from Ibadan University.

JOIN US FOR MORE ON:
or

Jesudunmo Longe is one of the three UI Law School graduates who received first-class honors.

She was also named the best graduating student from the University of Ibadan’s Department of Private and Property Law, with a 6.20 CGPA.

She claimed in an interview with TUNDE AJAJA that she worked hard to repay her parents’ love. The following are some highlights from the interview.

What prompted you to make the decision to pursue toward a first-class degree?

I had no intention of receiving a first-class diploma. I guess you could say I stumbled upon it. My older sister, Jesuferanmi, a senior in my faculty, saw some of my 100 level first semester results and informed me that if I kept up my work, I could graduate with a first-class degree.

After that, I became aware of it, and I also felt that if I could graduate with a first-class degree without having to work hard for it, I should just keep doing whatever I was doing since it seemed to be working.

At law school, on the other hand, I was more deliberate. I put forth a lot of effort and am grateful that everything worked out. Overall, I credit Jesus Christ, as well as my mother’s prayers, my father’s love, and the support of my siblings and inner group (of friends).

What should students do to achieve achievements as good as yours?

Know yourself and be true to yourself.’ Personally, I believe in God and do not take my mother’s prayers lightly. From my first year to my final year, I called her before every exam. Students must discover what works best for them. No matter what strategy you use, having a solid support system is really beneficial.

I’d also like to add a few points: grades are important, but they don’t define you, nor do they determine your worth. The concept of balance is a myth. Some topics take more attention than others, and this varies based on the individual and the situation. So, pick and choose what you pay attention to.

Just because you’re good at something doesn’t imply it’s what you’re supposed to do with your life. It is, nevertheless, preferable to stick to what you are good at and shine at, unless it does not provide you joy.

Do not be overly eager or succumb to the pressure to make money from your hobbies or passions. It’s fine to enjoy things simply for the sake of enjoying them. Young ladies should not shrink in order to appease other people’s inflated egos.

Jesudunmo Longe was an event director, MC, and many other things at school. When asked how she balanced school and work, she explained:

I didn’t have a reading routine since I was involved in too many things, some of which I was interested in and others which I was curious about.

In fact, I used my free time for things other than reading. It’s possible that I’ll be preoccupied with event preparation, movies, food shopping, napping, and church commitments. However, I made every effort to attend all of my classes. I wanted to eat my cake and have it too, so I took chances.

I was interested in blogging and decided to join Man O’ War. I’d even say I underperformed at university and law school, according to some of my friends. I knew I could have done much better if I had taken my studies more seriously.

The fact that I achieved a standard that is normally impossible without putting in a lot of effort does not imply that it was my best work.

I don’t have a formula for how I put everything together, but I also don’t recommend doing too many things.

Those things helped me since I learned a lot, gained a lot of experience, and learned to work in groups. There were times when I was on the verge of giving up, especially in law school, but thanks to a strong support system and Mercy Chinwo’s songs, I was able to persevere. I had good friends, but I never went out of my way to make new friends.

However, I was receptive enough and didn’t want to be famous or popular in law school. I was the hype woman in my circle, and I always had enough energy to go around (laughs).

Additional INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

What have you been up to since graduating from law school?

As a youth corps member, I work for a top-tier law company in North-Central Nigeria, and my program concludes in June. Aside from that, I’ve launched a YouTube channel where I talk about legal and societal concerns, as well as relationships, family life, lifestyle, and spirituality.

Could you tell me about any accolades you’ve received as a result of your achievements?

I won an award for being the best student in Land Law and the best (graduating) student in the Department of Private and Property Law when I graduated from university. I was awarded the Director General’s Prize for first-class students at the Law School.

What were the factors that drew you to the field of law?

Growing up, I had a variety of interests and pastimes, but law always appealed to me, and the profession’s limited access was a role; it’s either you’re a lawyer or you’re not. You can’t immediately walk out and buy a wig and gown when you wake up, but you could do writing, acting, or any of the other things I was interested in while working as a lawyer.

Also, among the many other things my father does, he is a lawyer, which I adore. That may have had some affect on me, however minor. My older sister works as a lawyer as well. That could have played a part as well, but no one pushed us to do so.

How did you manage to incorporate these into your academic work?

I didn’t have a reading routine since I was involved in too many things, some of which I was interested in and others which I was curious about. In fact, I used my free time for things other than reading. It’s possible that I’ll be preoccupied with event preparation, movies, food shopping, napping, and church commitments.

However, I made every effort to attend all of my classes. I wanted to eat my cake and have it too, so I took chances. I was interested in blogging and decided to join Man O’ War. I’d even say I underperformed at university and law school, according to some of my friends. I knew I could have done much better if I had taken my studies more seriously.

The fact that I achieved a standard that is normally impossible without putting in a lot of effort does not imply that it was my best work.

I don’t have a formula for how I put everything together, but I also don’t recommend doing too many things. Those things helped me since I learned a lot, gained a lot of experience, and learned to work in groups.

There were times when I was on the verge of giving up, especially in law school, but thanks to a strong support system and Mercy Chinwo’s songs, I was able to persevere. I had good friends, but I never went out of my way to make new friends.

However, I was receptive enough and didn’t want to be famous or popular in law school. I was the hype woman in my circle, and I always had enough energy to go around (laughs).

Which was more difficult, university life or law school?

University was simpler for me since I was younger, had less expectations, and was under less external pressure. Law School, on the other hand, was like being in a pressure cooker for a year, with a workload that seemed to balloon into something massive near the end.

Some of my friends and I joke that the law school curriculum should be split into two or three years. The grading system was also ineffective. It’s one thing to excel; it’s another to have your lowest score recorded as your overall grade, and it’s also a circumstance where you do it right the first time.

There are no supporting semesters to correct inaccuracies. But I’m grateful to God for sticking by me.

What were some of your favorite memories from high school and law school?

My matriculation number was called in class one day in my first year, and a lecturer asked to see me. It was a course that I had borrowed. I was understandably nervous, but when I met him, he said, “Well done, you did exceptionally well.”

In addition, a lecturer paid money to the best three students in her class in my last year, and I was one of them. I made a conscious effort not to stand out in class, yet those were unforgettable moments. Surprise visits from my parents and siblings, especially so close to exams, were quite beneficial. It meant a great deal to me.

Did they ever give you praise for a job well done?

Yes, they did, despite the fact that I believe having their daughter is adequate compensation. My folks are wonderful individuals.

As a result, most of the time, simply making them proud is sufficient motivation. I’m not sure if anything they did was to reward me for a good performance because they would have been there even if I hadn’t done so well.

They are fantastic; they are always supportive, and they, along with my siblings, mean the world to me. I couldn’t have had a nicer set of parents.

Did you have a track record of such high achievement in your previous schools?

Yes, I was the valedictorian of my secondary school, and I had a stack of presents and awards to take home every year of my senior secondary school. I didn’t have any problems getting in because I used the results of the General Certificate of Education exam that I passed in SS2.

How would you have felt if you hadn’t received a first-class diploma from both schools?

I’m pleased to have received a first-class degree from both colleges, but I’m not one to place weight on academic achievement. My grades don’t determine who I am.

However, I am fortunate in that my intelligence is reflected in my grades. I didn’t mind at all, but I always told God that if it wasn’t for me, it was for my parents. It was something I desired for them. They were quite supportive of me.

SOURCE :PUNCH



DISCLAIMER: Do not pay or release sensitive financial details to any organizer/recruiter unless futher verified from your end.
Get latest opportunities on WhatsApp

About the Author: Cleopatra Adeoye

Mass Communication Student, Federal University, Oye Ekiti and Content Creation Specialist. Join me on Twitter.

Got a question/Suggestion? Let's talk!